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Sundarbans

 / ©: Anne-Marie Singh/WWF-India
Mangrove ecosystem in the Sundarbans, India
© Anne-Marie Singh/WWF-India

WWF-India has been working in the Sundarbans since the launch of Project Tiger in 1973.

The Sundarbans is a cluster of low-lying islands in the Bay of Bengal, spread across India and Bangladesh, famous for its unique mangrove forests.
This active delta region is among the largest in the world, measuring about 40,000 sq. km. and is home to many rare and globally threatened wildlife species such as the Estuarine Crocodile (Crocodilus porosus), Royal Bengal Tiger (Panthera tigris), Water Monitor Lizard (Varanus salvator), Gangetic Dolphin (Platinista gangetica), Olive Ridley Turtle (Lepidochelys olivacea).

WWF-India has been working in the Sundarbans since the launch of Project Tiger in 1973. It began functioning through its West Bengal State Office to enhance environmental awareness by means of environment education initiatives. WWF has made significant investments in tiger landscape conservation since 2003, in the form of infrastructure strengthening and active community and development agency participation. WWF’s Sundarbans Programme was launched in April 2007, with a mission  to stop the degradation of the Sundarbans’ natural environment and to build a future in which humans live in harmony with nature. Habitat conservation, adaptation to climate change, advocacy and policy, human-wildlife conflict, livelihood augmentation, capacity building, and research and information dissemination are some of the key areas that the Programme is working in.