CSR Project Proposals | WWF India

CSR Project Proposals

Species and landscape conservation

Protecting the tigers in Ranthambhore

Ranthambhore is one of India’s oldest and most famous Tiger Reserves, with a long history of conservation dating back to the 1950s. But the tiger and these forests are under severe threats from populated human settlements, increased risks of poaching, degradation and fragmentation of habitat and a disconnect from adjoining forest areas. We need your support in ensuring the long term conservation of this majestic species in the Ranthambhore Tiger Reserve. We will work towards improving protection in the forest, monitoring tiger populations using state-of-the-art technology such as camera traps, working with the local communities to reduce forest dependence, and improving the grassland habitat by reviving specific areas.

Project location: Ranthambhore Tiger Reserve, Rajasthan
Time period: 3 years
Funding amount: INR 70 Lacs per year


 
	© Sunny Shah/WWF-India
Ranthambore tiger
© Sunny Shah/WWF-India

Conserving the elusive snow leopard

Often called the ‘Spirit of the mountains’, the elusive snow leopard is amongst the most enigmatic wild cat species of the world. Within India, its habitat is distributed across 5 Himalayan states, i.e. Jammu and Kashmir, Himachal Pradesh, Uttarakhand, Sikkim, and Arunachal Pradesh. It is facing increasing threats across its range, with the most severe being habitat loss, conflict with humans, and illegal wildlife trade. In just 2 decades, their global population has declined by 30%, and within India, less than 500 individuals remain across all 5 states. WWF-India has been working in Jammu and Kashmir and Himachal Pradesh towards the conservation of this species. We need your support to ensure this species and its habitat is protected and their long term survival is secured.

Project location: Jammu and Kashmir and Himachal Pradesh
Time period: 3 years
Funding amount: INR 75 Lacs per year

 
	© National Geographic Stock/Jason Edwards WWF
Snow leopard
© National Geographic Stock/Jason Edwards WWF

Conserving Olive Ridley Turtles in Kerala and Odisha

The Olive Ridley Turtle is the smallest of all sea turtles found in the world. It is found in the warm waters of the Indian Ocean, Pacific Ocean and Atlantic Ocean. In recent years, their numbers have been declining across its range as it faces several threats along its migration routes and nesting beaches. We have been working towards their conservation in Odisha, which is home to one of the largest and most famous turtle nesting beaches in the world. Our work has also spread to Kerala, where we aim to revive some of the nesting beaches, as well as increase protection along these beaches to ensure a safe and undisturbed habitat for these turtles. We need your support in carrying forward our work in Odisha and Kerala.
 
Project location: Vizhinjam beach, Thiruvananthapuram district, Kerala
Time period: 1 year
Funding amount: INR 12 Lacs 
 
Project location: Rushikulya and Devi mass nesting site and Bahuda river mouth, Odisha.
Time period: 3 years
Funding amount: INR 12 Lacs per year
 
	© Michael Peters/WWF-India
Olive Ridley Turtles
© Michael Peters/WWF-India

Conserving lesser known threatened species in India

The tiger, elephant and rhino are 3 of the most iconic and well known mega species that are threatened by a range of conservation issues. However, there are several other lesser known species that are equally iconic and important to the ecology of the planet and the forests they inhabit. These species are grossly neglected, and do not receive adequate attention and funds from the government, and even conservation organizations. WWF-India identified 11 such species, and developed a ‘Threatened Species Conservation programme’ in 2008, under which it is working towards the implementation of focused conservation plans for each individual species which address direct threats that affect the survival of the species. The programme focuses efforts on the Nilgiri tahr, snow leopard, black necked crane, smooth coated otter, leopard, gharial, sarus crane, sparrow, Manipuri brow antlered deer and Ganges river dolphin. The conservation status of these species ranges from critically endangered, to endangered and threatened. Some of these species such as great Indian bustard and Manipuri brow antlered deer are on the verge of extinction. There is still hope for these species if immediate action is taken now to revive their populations and work towards creating habitats conducive to their recovery.

Time period: 3 years
Funding amount: INR 10 – 15 lacs per year per species.

 
	© Peter Predit Paul/WWF-India
Nilgiri tahr
© Peter Predit Paul/WWF-India

Conserving critical habitat sand species in the western HImalayas

WWF-India’s western Himalayas landscape covers 66,000 sq km across Jammu and Kashmir and Himachal Pradesh. It is home to unique wildlife such as snow leopard, black necked crane, blue sheep and Kashmir stag, along with 100+ wetlands and cultural sites. The region faces severe threat of habitat loss and degradation, climate change, unsustainable tourism, poaching, community dependence on natural resources and human wildlife conflict. We have been working towards addressing these threats since the 1990s and have build a strong legacy in the region with significant conservation achievements. We request  your support towards this work focusing on conservation of critical wildlife habitats and snow leopards with the involvement of local communities as strong stakeholders in wildlife conservation.
 
Project location: Jammu and Kashmir and Himachal Pradesh
Time period: 3 years
Funding amount: INR 2 crores per year
 
	© Pankaj Chandan/WWF-India
The Black-necked Crane
© Pankaj Chandan/WWF-India

Conserving high altitude wetlands in west Sikkim

Sikkim is home to more than 220 wetlands, most of which are High Altitude Wetlands found more than 3000 metres above sea level. They are all considered sacred by the local communities and dwelling places of gods and goddesses. Today, many of these wetlands are severely affected by rising tourism pressures. They fall along popular trekking routes, and are resting places for tourists and pilgrims, who leave behind huge volumes of non biodegradable waste. One such lake heavily affected by tourism activities is Samiti lake in West Sikkim. We need your support in implementing long term conservation measures around the Samiti lake to ensure that its cultural, social and biodiversity values are preserved.

Project location: Samiti lake, 4,300 metres above sea level in west Sikkim
Time period: 3 years
Funding amount: INR 25 Lacs per year

 
	© Yuksam HR Team Members
Samity Lake
© Yuksam HR Team Members

Promoting blood free honey in Sundarbans

Honey collection in the Sundarbans delta is a life threatening business. Yet, thousands of poor fishermen and villagers living around the forests of the Sundarbans Tiger Reserve depend of honey collection for their livelihood. Every year, they risk their lives to reach the most remote parts of the forest to collect one of the best quality honey in the country and in the process, many lose their lives in fatal tiger attacks. We believe that these casualties can be avoided if honey collectors use domestic bees to produce honey, instead of going into the forest to extract honey produced from wild bees. We need your support in ensuring these communities can retain their livelihood of collecting honey, without losing blood and lives over it.

Project location: Sundarbans
Time period: 3 years
Funding amount: INR 10 Lacs per year

 
	© WWF-India
© WWF-India

Climate Change and Energy

Project Sahasra Jyoti

We believe that access to clean, sustainable and affordable energy is fundamental to meet the balance between development, conservation initiatives, and poverty eradication. We are working with local communities living around forests across India to provide renewable energy solutions such as micro-solar power plants, solar charging stations, solar water heaters, solar lanterns, solar street lights, and biogas units for their energy needs. We need your support in providing energy access to 1,000 households in the Sundarbans, which is an ecologically sensitive area with a large human population bludgeoned by poverty due to lack of opportunity. This project aims to set up individual micro solar power stations that will provide grid quality electricity to 15 – 20 hamlets in Satjelia island in Sundarbans. We already have a technology partner on board for this. The Technology partner is leading European corporation with a presence in over 100 countries, and is a specialist in energy management and efficient technologies.

Project location: Satjelia island, Sundarbans
Time period: 1.5 - 2 years
Funding amount: INR 2 Crore


 
	© WWF-India
Micro solar power station
© WWF-India

Promoting Renewable Energy based transportation

The Indian Sundarbans is a network of low lying islands in the Bay of Bengal, separated from one another and the mainland by interconnected tidal rivers, creeks and canals. This isolation makes last mile connectivity in the region extremely challenging. The current transportation options used in Sundarbans are polluting, unsafe, and unsustainable. We believe that introducing and promoting renewable energy based transport such as electric vehicles will lead to a cleaner and more sustainable transportation sector, thereby improving livelihoods and benefiting environment conservation in the Sundarbans. It has the potential to offset 4000 tonnes of CO2 emissions every year! We need your support in developing and testing these electric vehicles.

Project location: Sundarbans
Time period: 3 years
Funding amount: INR 14 Lacs per year

 
	© WWF-India
© WWF-India

Education for sustainable development

Education plays a very important role in shaping the mind set of our societies. Given the speed at which our world is changing, and the complicated environmental issues we face, our education system needs to go through a drastic change to ensure we are educating our next generation with the right values and understanding they need to pave out a sustainable future for themselves and our planet. Education For Sustainable Development is a vision of education that seeks to balance human and economic well-being with cultural traditions and respect for the surrounding environment. We need your support in ensuring ESD becomes the core of the Indian education system so that our children learn new skills and new ways of living sustainable with respect for themselves, each other, and the planet.

Project location: Assam, Madhya Pradesh, Chhattisgarh, West Bengal
Time period: 3 year
Funding amount: INR 40 Lacs per year per state

 
	© WWF-India
© WWF-India

TRAFFIC India

Curbing illegal wildlife trade with sniffer dogs

wildlife trade with sniffer dogs Illegal wildlife trade is a serious cause of concern for wildlife conservation and has evolved into an organized transnational activity threatening the survival of many species in India. The current practices of detecting illegal wildlife trade do not match up to the tricks and disguises employed by wildlife traders to smuggle products across national and international borders. There is a need to implement new and innovative methods to detect wildlife trade. Sniffer dogs are an integral part of many enforcement agencies and are used to sniff out clues at crime scenes. In 2008, TRAFFIC, the wildlife trade monitoring wing of WWF-India, introduced the Sniffer Dog programme in India, and promoted the inclusion of trained sniffer dogs in wildlife enforcement teams. TRAFFIC runs a sniffer dog training programme, where dogs and their handlers are trained in detecting tiger and leopard bones and skins and bear bile. So far, 11 dogs have been trained since 2008, and have helped in more than 80 seizures across India. Encouraged by the success of this initiative, TRAFFIC is receiving requests from several State Forest Departments for training of sniffer dogs. At present, immediate funding is required to train 13 more dogs and their handlers for the states of Assam, Jharkhand, Madhya Pradesh, Maharashtra, Karnataka and Tamil Nadu.

Time period: 9 months per training
Funding amount: INR 12 lacs to train 6 dogs | INR 30 lacs to train 13 dogs and improve the training centre facilities.

 
	© TRAFFIC
Sniffer dogs
© TRAFFIC

Working with local communities

Sustainable livelihood opportunities for scheduled tribes around protected areas*

India’s forests and natural resources not only support wildlife, but also thousands of local communities living in and around forests, who depend on them for their energy and livelihood needs. These communities bear the cost of wildlife conservation efforts, as protection to forests results in restriction of access to natural resources. WWF-India works with local communities in different geographical regions to reduce forest dependence and diversify livelihood opportunities to ensure communities remain supportive of conservation initiatives. Under this project, we aim to work in 50 villages around 10 Protected Areas in India, and demonstrate technological innovations that enhance their livelihood opportunities.

Time period: 2 years
Funding amount: INR 1 Crore per year
*This project will be implemented in partnership with local NGOs working with the tribal communities around Protected Areas. It will also seek technology support from several agencies such as the Department of Science and Technology, Government of India, Ministry of Environment and Forests, IIT Mumbai and Delhi, Forest Research Institute, IIFM, and ARTI (Pune).
 
	© Vishaish Uppal/WWF-India.
© Vishaish Uppal/WWF-India.

Restoring water bodies in Assam to secure livelihoods and promote conservation

Assam has more fresh water wetlands than any other state in the North Eastern Region. The flood plains of the 2 major drainage systems, Brahmaputra and Barak, support more than 1,85,000 marshy depressions, swamps, and perennial water bodies of carrying shapes, sizes and depths, locally known as beels. In recent times, due to increased unplanned infrastructure development, urbanisation and human interventions, many wetlands and ponds are facing severe degradation ranging from increase in siltation, dumping of wastes and infestation of weeds. This is resulting in unhealthy and unproductive ecosystems, incapable of supporting aquatic life as well as livelihoods of the rural people who depend on these wetlands for fishing and irrigation. We believe that these water bodies are of significance beyond just being vital sources of water for wildlife and humans. They need to be revived and restored so that they can augment income for the local communities as well as help in diversification of non-farm based livelihoods, as the current farming practices of the locals is affected by human wildlife conflict. We aim to restore seven local water bodies which are used by 3 villages in 2 districts of Assam, and introduce fisheries as an alternative livelihood option, which will help augment their incomes as well as diversify their livelihoods.

Project location: Kaziranga National Park, Assam
Time period: 2 years
Funding amount: INR 18 Lacs per year

 
	© WWF-India
© WWF-India
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