Resource material | WWF India

Resource material

Saving Wetlands Sky-High!

WWF’s regional initiative, ‘Saving Wetlands Sky-High!’ is working with its country offices in Pakistan, India, Nepal, Bhutan and China to mobilize governments, communities and local stakeholders towards conservation of Himalayan high altitude wetlands. And but obvious, we needed to inform people about it.

This programme brochure was launched in 2009 with the clear objective of laying out information about the Saving Wetlands Sky-High! programme and the work that is being done under it. 

 
	© WWF-India
"Saving Wetlands Sky-High" brochure
© WWF-India

Living with Change

The WWF film, Living with Change, captures real life testimonies from local residents of Ladakh who have experienced the impacts of climate change first hand. This 20-minute film brings forth the voices of the very people who live in this melting paradise and are desperately searching for ways to adapt and survive. Farmers, tour guides, local leaders, nomads, scientists and even those passionate about Ladakh’s beauty, now have their real life stories captured on film. The film is available both in English and Ladakhi.

 

Ladakh Field Guides

These booklets belong to a series of bilingual (English and Ladakhi) field guides developed by WWF-India, Defence Institute of High Altitude Research (DIHAR) and Department of Wildlife Protection, Government of Jammu and Kashmir. They represent WWF’s work in conserving the fragile wetlands of Ladakh and are an effort to raise awareness, especially amongst the local youth, researchers, environmentalists and army personnel, and get them involved in conservation efforts.

Field Guide: Birds of Ladakh
By Pankaj Chandan, Mohd. Abbas, Parikshit Gautam
The Field Guide on Birds of Ladakh is a comprehensive bank of information about various key species of birds found in Ladakh and aims to guide birdwatchers from across the world, visiting the area. The Ladakhi translation is meant to aid the local youth in knowing and understanding bird species like the endangered Black-necked Crane, Bar-headed Goose, Great-crested Grebe and many more in their own language. This effort is also aimed at reducing the anthropogenic pressure, which is being seen as one of the major threats to the survival of bird species in Ladakh.

Field Guide: Floral Diversity of Ladakh
By OP Chaurasia, Nisa Khatoon, Shashi Bala Singh
The Field Guide on Floral Diversity of Ladakh comes from a thorough study of 69 medicinal, aromatic and other important plant specimens of ethnobotanical significance. These have been described along with brief botanical notes, habit and habitat, ethnobotanical uses and status. The guide also briefly describes high altitude vegetation categorising it into Alpine mesophytes, Oasitic vegeatation and Desert vegetation along with describing typical plant behaviour and mechanisms which help them adapt to such altitudes. Most of these floral species have medicinal properties.

Field Guide: Mammals of Ladakh
By Tahir shawl, Jigmet Takpa, Phuntsog Tashi, Yamini Panchaksharam
Ladakh is home to 33 species of mammals, in particular the richest wild sheep and goat community, all of them being listed under different Schedules of the Jammu and Kashmir Wildlife (Protection) Act, 1978 (Amended 2002). Apart from that, the Snow Leopard, Tibetan Antelope, pikas, Wild Yak, Himalayan Brown Bear, Royle’s Mountain Vole and a numerous other species are found in Ladakh. The fauna of eastern Ladakh is influenced by the Tibetan Plateau while the central and eastern parts of this region are influenced by the Himalayan and Central Asian species.

Black-necked Crane

Status, Breeding, Productivity and Conservation in Ladakh, India – A Report
Based on intensive studies and surveys in the harsh and unique environment of Ladakh between 2000 and 2004, this report on the ‘Vulnerable’ Black-necked Crane contains findings which will be of great interest to ornithologists and particularly people working on cranes. The report first provides general information on the cranes of the world and then hones down on the Black-necked Crane, giving a detailed account of the survey observations from almost all the wetlands of eastern Ladakh, where the Black-necked Crane is known to breed and feed. Such an exhaustive survey is the first ever to be conducted in all the 22 wetlands in this region.

Basically, the report puts into one place most of the important research related to status, breeding productivity and conservation of the Black-necked Crane in the Ladakh region of India

 
 
	© WWF-India
BNC report cover
© WWF-India

Posters

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